Archive

Posts Tagged ‘enemy at the gates’

Daisy – the latest from Nancy Paton

‘Daisy’, is the latest film from Nancy Paton, an Australian/Polish director, producer and award winning writer, and founder of Paton Productions.

Already in post, Dean and I are delighted to be involved and have recently designed their latest film poster, as seen here.

Next week, we see the first look screening at Warner Bros. De Lane Lea, and then we look forward to getting going on the titles.

Working again with our dear friend editor Emma Gaffney, is as always a huge pleasure – Having worked together previously on films such as Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Vaccums and Enemy at the Gates.

Nancy Paton Daisy Filming

Starring Hattie Gotobed (Snow White and the Huntsman), Max Brown (Turistas), and Lucy Russell (Batman Begins), Daisy’ depict the last days of a thirteen-year-old girl called Daisy, who suffers from sever RECESSIVE DYSTROPHIC EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA (RDEB), and by chance meets Peter, an Iraq War veteran who suffers from drug addiction. Like Peter Pan, he is stuck in Neverland and Daisy, like Wendy, inspires him to change his ways. Daisy helps Peter learn to appreciate life, find home, but most importantly find love, something that she will never experience. As the credits run, we are left wondering what such a powerful little girl could have done with a lifetime of days.

Nancy wrote this award-winning screenplay as a way of raising awareness for a cause close to her heart. While the film has innocence in its tone, it is eager to depict the suffering from Dystrophic Epidermolysis accurately. Nancy worked with children at Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital and whilst there met an inspirational 9 year old girl called Maisy Keetch, who played Isabella in ‘Daisy’ and who suffers from EB in real life.

Alongside the filming of Daisy, a special documentary film is being made featuring children with EB, and their families, nurses and doctors who care for them. The idea is to encourage the film industry to offer more opportunities in the future for children and adults with disabilities and disease.

Nancy is also currently filming ‘Postpartum’ which she has written, a film charting the final days of a woman suffering with Postpartum depression. And is in pre-production on ‘Touched’, which intricately weaves together the lives of western scientists and local PNG tribes people, seen through the eyes of two woman each on their own path of discovery, who’s actions share a share destiny.

 

Daisy Film Poster

Advertisements

Televisual interview: Playing The Title Role

September 8, 2014 Leave a comment

Televisual

We are delighted to be featured in this months (September) issue of Televisual.

For those of you that cannot get a copy of the magazine, here below is the full interview given by Editor Jon Creamer:

Q: At what stage of the film’s life do you get involved in a project?

A: The lead times we have can vary immensely, sometimes we have to turn projects around very quickly and sometimes we are involved very early on. Since we’ve been in this business more than 30 years, our clients know we can offer more than opening and closing sequences, for example – sometimes we are called upon to offer consultancy for clients to make recommendations about the structure of their films and series before they are finalized, to help them with keeping the momentum and engagement of the audience throughout the feature.

Q: How are you briefed? And who are you briefed by?

A: That has two answers firstly we have repeat clients like Tim Burton and Stephen Frears who come straight to us on a non-competitive basis. Then there is the first time directors or producers, who we like to chat and share our joint passions in film, TV and life in general. This gives us all a good start and helps build trust from the outset, and luckily we are all still in a people driven business. Also on both cases we like to read the script. Second meetings and briefings could well involve the executives from the studio like Warner Bros. or TV Channel etc.

Q: Are you able to see the finished film before you begin?

A: Yes we would see rough-cut scenes and then followed by a first assembly of the entire movie, which normally is over length and these days with large patches of ‘green screen’, sometimes along with temp music as well.

Q: What informs the concept you come up with?

A: Looking at the under belly of the movie firstly. By which I mean not the visual scenes but more the rhythm, pace, emotions and tone etc. Then it is possible to project a symbolic foretaste of what is to come, and create a receptive atmosphere that will enable the movie to begin hopefully on a higher level of audience engagement, right from the first frame.

Q: Do you have music to work with?

A: No that collaboration comes later down the creative process, once we have all agreed on the chosen visual concept and tone. This can now be formed into a rough animatic timeline to length. Then the composer can score directly on what he or she sees.

Q: Do you come up with a variety of routes and then the producer or director chooses one?

A: It depends, sometimes one idea becomes very clear in the thinking. Sometimes it needs a selection of thoughts.

Q: Can you often create bespoke sequences, are you able to shoot things yourself, use animation?

A: Starting from a blank piece of paper and an open mind. The passion and joy is to see the life come into the sequence by each member of our team adding to the overall communication of the sequence. I will always direct my own scenes that are needed, and we create our own animation and special effects.

Q: How much time do you get to produce the titles?

A: On average, around 3 to 4 months, depending on what is involved. We have been known to work on sequences for more than 8 months, such as Jupiter Ascending.

Q: Is there a good budget for the titles, or are you at the end of the financial
chain?

A: Budgets work in accordance to the size scale of the movie at hand. We work across the board, large and small each has its own rewards and problems to win over. We also bear in mind small first time director or production companies today could turn out to be the biggest in time.

Q: Do you work on your own or is a team involved? Who else is involved?

A: The Morrison Studio is a collective. We build individual teams for each project, whether it is a studio motion picture, independent production, interstitial or branding project. It is essential that our team has the highest calibre of creatives, VFX artists, and technicians involved relative to the skill sets required.

Q: What is the secret to great title design?

A: Lots of factors, but essentially I would say a good script. Then It can be pushed creatively.

 

BAFTA, What next for the UK Film Industry?

BAFTA - What Next For The UK Film Industry

Tomorrow night I will be joining the question time at the Princess Anne Theatre – BAFTA, as part of the conversation to quiz some of the industry’s brightest thinkers about the ups and downs and highs and lows for UK films in 2012, and to see where we’re heading this year and beyond.

On the panel along with Kate O’Connor – Executive Director and Deputy CEO of Creative Skillset and Wendy Mitchell – Editor of Screen International and Screendaily.com, will be Iain Smith – Chair of the British Film Commission and Producer of such films as ‘Wanted’ and ‘Children of Men’.

I first met Iain back in 1984 on The Killing Fields‘ working with Roland Joffé who directed the film, and then a couple of years later in 1986 on Roland’s next film The Missionstarring Robert De Niro. The following year I had the great pleasure again as we teamed-up for Seven Years in Tibet, which was the first film I did for Jean-Jacques Annaud, who later I went on and created the titles for Enemy at the Gates and Two Brothers.

Titles sequences done for Producer Iain Smith

Joining Iain will also be James Watkins – Director and Screenwriter, with credits including ‘Woman in Black’ and ‘Eden Lake’. Plus Xavier Marchand – Managing Director of Momentum Pictures and President of International Distribution of Alliance Films. Xavier’s recent films include Welcome to the Punch‘ – which we also created the title sequences for.

It will be good to catch-up with Iain and to see what insights the panel can share on key issues affecting UK film.

Inside Andy Brown’s own Four Walls

February 14, 2012 Leave a comment

Andy Brown founded Four Walls in 2006, following a career at some of London’s best post houses. He is an artist who has bridged analogue to digital visual communication, with total understanding of the demands needed in this fast moving medium and always with a keen eye on its future.

Dean and I have had the pleasure of working with Andy over the years on projects such as Enemy at the Gates, The Constant Gardener, and Tania Hoser’s ten minute short Grandma, which I produced.

Working closely with long-time producer Toby Abbott, Four Walls provides post-production solutions for a wide variety of clients and projects from around the world.

After a successful first year in their new home at 93 Wardour Street, Soho. They have upgraded their software and hardware facilities last week to include Flame and Flame Premium. Giving the capability of starting up as Flame, Smoke or Lustre.

Andy says “We’re really excited with this update as it gives us some powerful new capabilities. We’re planning to expand the grading side of the business in response to demand from clients and Lustre provides us with a great toolset. Add that to the latest updates for Flame and the increasing demand for Smoke and we are very happy!”

We wish Andy and Toby all the best for the future.

Andy Brown Four Walls

%d bloggers like this: